How do I diagnose metastatic giant cell tumor into lung

  • Klaus Kayser Charite - Berlin
  • Stephan Borkenfeld
  • Krasi Serguieva
  • Gian Kayser

Abstract

This 26 years old male patient developed an osteoblastic tumor in the right os metatarsale I at the age of 21 years. The lesion was excised en bloc including the os cuneiforme and the m. extensor hallucis. After surgery a venal thrombosis occurred and was treated by thrombectomy and anti coagulation therapy. Five years later 9 intrapulmonary lesions were noted which were radiologically consistent with intra-pulmonary metastases. Two separate right and left lung surgeries were performed, and 17 active metastases of the left lung as well as 18 metastases of the right lung were excised. Post surgery course was inconspicuous. No cytostatic therapy was applied. The patient is still alive 13 years after surgery.


Virtual Slides: www.diagnosticpathology.eu/vs/2015_1_65

Published
2015-08-15
How to Cite
KAYSER, Klaus et al. How do I diagnose metastatic giant cell tumor into lung. Diagnostic Pathology, [S.l.], aug. 2015. ISSN 2364-4893. Available at: <http://www.diagnosticpathology.eu/content/index.php/dpath/article/view/65>. Date accessed: 12 dec. 2018. doi: https://doi.org/10.17629/www.diagnosticpathology.eu-2015-1:65.
Issue
Section
How do I diagnose

Keywords

Primary Osteosarcoma; Sarcoidosis; Tuberculosis; Interstitial pneumonitis and angiitis

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